Small Animal Internal Medicine

Brooke Ramay

Brooke Ramay

Assistant Professor

brooke.ramay@wsu.edu

 

Biography:

Dr. Brooke Ramay has a dual appointment as a clinical pharmacy professor and researcher at Universidad del Valle in Guatemala (UVG) and Washington State University respectively. She also serves as clinical volunteer faculty at UCSF. Dr. Ramay received a Distinguished Faculty Award from UVG in 2018 for her work with pharmacy students in Guatemala. She has worked on research related to access to medications and antibiotic use in the Center for Health Studies at UVG and antimicrobial resistance with WSU. She has worked on research related to medication use and antimicrobial resistance with a particular interest in defining community, household, animal and human-level risk factors for carriage of antimicrobial resistant Enterobacteriaciea in the community and hospital setting in Guatemala. 

Personal Statement:

When I was an undergraduate, I was fascinated by organic chemistry and as a student I worked on new paths for vancomycin synthesis (an important antibiotic used in hospital settings). When I was asked to deliver a talk about my work to our research group, I realized I was more interested in the drug’s effects on the human body than in the actual synthesis. Drawn to the idea of getting out of the lab and interacting with people, and excited to speak to patients about how drugs work, I opted to study Clinical Pharmacy. When I moved to Guatemala after obtaining my Pharm D., I serendipitously (and with a little persistence) began working in public health research; I began studying access to medication and antibiotic use, which led to more rigorous analysis of antimicrobial resistance. My professional journey has also included a short-stint teaching Quantum Mechanics and a more sustainable professorship teaching Clinical Pharmacology at Universidad del Valle in Guatemala.

Although our only current pet is a turtle, I am from a small town in northern California and, as a young girl, raised pigs and had horses, thus, I feel at home in the Allen School. I am an avid runner and enjoy listening to audiobooks and podcasts while getting my feet off the ground. 

Education &Training:

Dr. Ramay received her bachelor of science in Chemistry and a minor in Spanish from the college of creative studies at University of California Santa Barbara (2001). She was a regent scholar at the University of California San Francisco and received her Pharm D in 2006. She is a licensed pharmacist in California.


Select Publications

  • Anson A, Ramay B, de Esparza AR, Bero L. (2012) Availability, prices and affordability of the World Health Organization's essential medicines for children in Guatemala. Global Health ;8:22. doi: 10.1186/1744-8603-8-22. PMID: 22747646 PMCID: PMC3503802
  • Ramay BM, Lambour P, Cerón A. (2015) Comparing antibiotic self-medication in two socio-economic groups in Guatemala City: a descriptive cross-sectional study. BMC Pharmacol Toxicol ;16:11. doi: 10.1186/s40360-015-0011-3. PMID: 25928897 PMCID: PMC4418049
  • Ramay BM, Cerón A, Méndez-Alburez LP, Lou-Meda R. (2017) Factors associated to acceptable treatment adherence among children with chronic kidney disease in Guatemala. PLoS One ;12(10):e0186644. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0186644. eCollection 2017. PMID: 29036228 PMCID: PMC5643062
  • Ramay B.M, Jara J, Purificación MP, Lupo P, Serrano C, Alvis JP, Arriola CS, Veguilla V, Kaydos-Daniels SC (2018) Self-medication and etiologies of individuals presenting at with influenza-like illness: Guatemala City, 2018 influenza season Poster Presentation, International Conference on Emerging Infectious Disease 2018 - manuscript in CDC clearance
  • Ramay BM, Caudell M, Cordon-Rosales C, Archila LD, Palmer GH, Jarquin C, Moreno MP, McCracken JP, Rozenkrantz L, Amram O, Omulo S, Call DR (2020) Antibiotic use and hygiene interact to influence the distribution of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in Guatemala Distinguished Oral Presentation at the 6th Decennial International Conference on Healthcare Associated Infections Manuscript in review

 

Washington State University